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20121204
20121204
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changes may mean two different groups. joining us here on our washington d.c. site is gregory nojeim at the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e-mails and cell phones? >> guest: the short answer is that is confused and the longer answer is for e-mail that is less than 180 days old law enforcement need to warrant -- for e-mail more than 180 years old, it is just a subpoena, so there's no judicial intervention, no high standard of proof. for documents you store in the clouds, if you store something with google docs and come back and edit it, that is available with a subpoena. cell phones, there is no statutory provision about location information. so the courts have been in different places. some say if it is real-time location, for that they need a warrant. others say this gps location for that they need a warrant. there is not a clear rule yet for cell phone. >> host: what are the changes the judicial committee has approved? >> guest: they focus on content of communications. they said it should matter how will the content
with oklahoma republican tom cole from this morning's washington journal. >> host: we want to welcome back to the table congressman tom cole, republican of oklahoma. let's begin with the news. house speaker john boehner sent a proposal to the white house yesterday, counterbid as it is being called. what do you think? >> guest: i think it is a great opening start. actually it makes very tangible with the speaker committed to after the election which is we are going to put it on the table so that question is settled and we are not talking about how much and what way, but that is an enormous step forward honestly by the republicans or concessions. not something we want to do but something we recognize we have to do to get there. so i think the speaker's proposal directs us to words what some of the problems are which are entitlement spending. that is what is driving the debt and we can't pussyfoot around it. we can't solve it with just revenue, you have to have reform. while we like the ryan budget and i think i would be the appropriate way to go, they picked up elements of some of the propos
to welcome everyone to george washington university. if i could ask everyone to please turn off their cell phones. as you can see, it's a crowded house. the purpose of this event, and all events, is to examine in some sort of depth the various national security challenges facing the united states, and in the case, not only the united states but also the african continent. when you look at the area of responsibility africom has, it's so-ing, in terms of complexity and geography. many of you are well aware, at least this informed audience, that counterterrorism is still an issue the united states needs to take seriously. i think for some, with respect to africa, came to light with the tragic events in ben georgia circumstance but as general ham well knows, this has been challenging the united states and others for quite some time. the terrorist threat has metastasized. ding-dong, the witch is not dead, referring to osama bin laden. you see threats move and gravitate to un and understood protected areas. obviously al qaeda some the islamic maghreb seems to be on the march. they're spread and
such great work on this measure over many months, as well as to senator cantwell of washington and other colleagues who have cosponsored this measure, including senators collins, feinstein, gillibrand, kerry, landrieu, merkley, mikulski, murray, vitter, and wyden. they are tireless animal advocates, and this bill is indeed, the amendment as well, are about ending animal fighting, which plainly and simply is a blood sport. it is something that is cruel and inhumane. it leaves animals scarred and disabled. and it is associated with many other criminal activities. people who attend animal fights are often also engaged in drug dealing, extortion, assault, a variety of criminal activities, and the enabling activity is animal fighting. and that is why this bill increases the penalties for knowingly -- knowingly -- attending an animal fight with a child and, indeed, makes it a crime to knowingly attend an animal fight. so these penalties -- stricter penalties for bringing a child knowingly and criminal penalties of up to a year imprisonment or a fine or both for knowingly attending an animal fi
to their homes and neighborhoods. now, as new yorkers we've been reading the stories, but the rest of washington, stories of heartbreak are unimaginable. the most heartbreaking story was when i went to staten island and we -- we met with first responders whose job was to find two children. what happened in this case was a mother was worried because she had lost power and her husband told her to find a different place to stay with the children and urged her to go to brooklyn to see her mother. she took the children in the car. would have been staten island as the storm surge was so severe. a 10-foot wave came across the road she took her children out of the car, tried to get to higher land and they were taken from her arms. these children were two years old and four years old and the mother could do nothing because the storm is so strong. she is just one story of many families who lost their lives because of the storm. i can tell you our mayor and governor worked so hard to evacuate families. they evacuated families all across new york and that's one of the reasons why the lost life was as low as
never get the "washington post" to print this point, but robert byrd when he was majority leader exercise the nuclear option four times. it goes back to the beginning of the senate whereby you set binding precedent in the senate by simple majority rules. furthermore, it was being used admittedly extraordinary, one that i think out to be used in very rare occasion, only for extenuating circumstances was done not to up in the tradition but to restore it. prior to 2003 derrick never been a judge, avril edition nominee denied confirmation deeply filibuster. never, never, never never. beginning with -- i think ultimately five judges who have the majority support, push judges who were all denied confirmation deeply filibuster though they had majority support. prior to that it'd never happen. so we are trying to restore the what it always been. you can argue that ought to be a majority. that had not been the standard pride 2003. on your question of time, you're right. biggest vulnerability is time. everything takes so long. i remember when it came to the house and i came over to the sen
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7